Chairs and Seating

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plank stool
3 legged stool
joint stool
embroidered stool
thrown stool
milking stool

M5
Mediaeval stool
This would have been the seating used by all except the master of the house

£20

E29
Three-legged stool
All periods, a simple low stool that sits firmly on uneven floors

£5

E7
Joint Stool
Tudor onwards, the most common seating

£35

E8
upholstered stool
Bargello designs vary. This one is honeycomb

£65

E45
Thrown stool
chairs and stools made by the local turner from fresh green wood were a cheap and common seating option.

£40

W11
Milking stool
Very basic joinery, common in Wales.

£10

Mediaeval bench
joined bench
upholstered bench
Carolean day bed

M4
plank bench
Mediaeval

£25

E9
joined bench
The usual seating at the Tudor table

£40

E10
upholstered bench
Bargello designs vary. This one is Florentine flame

£110

JC5
Carolean chair bed.
1660 onwards. Designed for an age of greater elegance and comfort.

£200

Glastonbury chair
low panelled chair
high panelled chair
Gothic chair
Monk's chair

M33
Glastonbury chair
based on chairs used in Glastonbury Abbey. Although it looks as if it should fold, it is really designed for easy dismantling.

£65

M1
low panelled chair
Mediaeval, with linenfold panelling, approximately 4" high

£105

M2
high panelled chair
Mediaeval, with Gothic panelling, approximately 5" high

£130

M30
Gothic panelled chair
Mediaeval, with pierced Gothic panelling, approximately 5" high

£150

E44
Monk's Chair
A common name for a chair that converts to a table by tipping the back forwards. Tudor and Stuart period (and therefore nothing to do with monks)

£90

winged frame chair
frame chair
Carqueteuse
X framed chair
Carolean Armchair

E1
frame chair A
Tudor, onwards. A strong construction but lighter than the preceding panelled chairs

£120

E2
frame chair B
Tudor and Stuart (16th and 17th centuries)

£120

E3
carqueteuse
Also known as a carquetoire, or chattering chair, this was intended for ladies, with wide skirts

£80

E4
X framed chair
Seen in many portraits of the Tudor and early Stuart period, although relatively few have survived because of the inherent weakness of the design. Other colours of leather are available

£75

JC4
Carolean armchair
1660 onwards. Cane seating became common when the 17th Century East India Company expanded trade with the far east.

£150

backstool
farthingale chair
vermeer chair
Carolean chair

E5
backstool
As it says, a stool with a back. These would have been found in Tudor parlours, often in pairs, but not in the dining hall. At table, people other than the master of the house sat on benches or stools until well into the 17th century

£50

E6
farthingale chair
A Victorian name for a backstool with embroidered upholstery. Bargello designs vary. This one is carnation

£100

JC2
Vermeer chair
My name for a type of 17th Century chair seen in several of Vermeer's pictures. Alternative colours of leather are available.

£50

JC1
Carolean chair
Late 17th century.

£120

thrown chair A
Thrown chair B
Thrown chair C
Thrown chair D

E46
Thrown chair A
A turned stool with back support.

£55

E47
Thrown chair B

£100

E48
Thrown chair C
A great test of the turner's skill, but possibly not the most comfortable chair

£150

E49
Thrown chair D
based on a chair reputedly used by King Stephen

£150

State chair

E42
State chair
16th Century, with vVarious designs, but usually about 7" high. Definitely for show rather than for comfort. More common in France, being typical of the French Renaissance, but also found in the grander English houses.

£250

Welsh chair

W10
Welsh chair
A basic predecessor of the Windsor chair

£30

Welsh settle
Mediaeval settle
Tudor settle
panelled dresser

W5
Plank settle
Common in Wales. The seat opens into a storage chest

£40

M7
Mediaeval settle
often built in place as wall panelling or room dividers.

£100

E11
Tudor settle
16th and 17th centuries

£120

W7
Panelled settle
Common in Wales. The seat opens into a storage chest

£80

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